Date: Wednesday, January 19, 2022
Time: 10:00am-11:00am EST


Description:

Scientific breakthroughs show that levels of coronavirus genetic material in wastewater systems can provide an unbiased measure of coronavirus transmission for a community to guide public policy and response to the pandemic.

This free, 1-hour webinar introduces the New York State wastewater-based epidemiology network. The network provides real-time monitoring of wastewater for coronavirus RNA. In collaboration with the New York State Department of Health and New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Dr. David Larsen’s team is working to scale a wastewater surveillance network across New York State to aid the response to public health threats.

By January 2022, this new network aims to include at least one wastewater treatment plant in each New York State county to monitor for COVID-19. Join us to learn more about the current progress for monitoring wastewater for public health benefit and ask questions about the network during a facilitated discussion. Wastewater treatment staff are encouraged to attend.

For additional information, check out the Wastewater Surveillance Network website!

Also available for viewing is the Governor’s press release about the new network.

Presenters:

  • David A. Larsen, PhD MPH, Associate Professor and MPH Director, Falk College Department of Public Health, Syracuse University
  • Mary B. Collins, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Studies, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
  • Dustin T. Hill, PhD, Postdoctoral Researcher, Falk College Department of Public Health, Syracuse University

Who Should Attend:

  • Wastewater treatment plant operators
  • County and municipal governments
  • Elected officials and staff
  • Public health officials
  • Students, staff and faculty

Partners:

This webinar is organized by Syracuse University Falk College Department of Public Health and the SU Environmental Finance Center, and is co-sponsored by the New York Water Environment Association (NYWEA) and NYS Water Resources Institute.